note the release of 4.7
[nano-editor.git] / news.php
index b8a0a63c498415cda002ca30ef468ff57c811794..9777337aedd99003d538e18b1fb30f07c9a23493 100644 (file)
--- a/news.php
+++ b/news.php
 <td>
 <br><br>
 
+2019 December 23 - <b>GNU nano 4.7</b> "Havikskruid"
+<li>A &lt;Tab&gt; will indent a marked region only when mark and cursor are<br>
+  on different lines.</li>
+<li>Two indentations (any mix of tabs and spaces) are considered the<br>
+  same when they look the same (that is: indent to the same level).</li>
+<li>When using <tt>--breaklonglines</tt> or <tt>^J</tt>, a line will never be broken in<br>
+  its leading whitespace or quoting.</li>
+<li>The keywords in nanorc files must be in lowercase.</li>
+
+2019 November 29 - <b>GNU nano 4.6</b> "And don't you eat that yellow snow"
+<br>
+<table><tr><td><ul>
+<li>The 'formatter' command has returned, bound by default to <tt>M-F</tt>.<br>
+  It allows running a syntax-specific command on the contents of<br>
+  the buffer.</li>
+<li><tt>^T</tt> will try to run 'hunspell' before 'spell', because it checks<br>
+  spellling for the locale's language and understands UTF-8.</li>
+<li>Multiple errors or warnings on startup will no longer slow nano<br>
+  down but will be indicated on the status bar with trailing dots.</li>
+</ul></td></tr></table>
+<br><br>
+
 2019 October 4 - <b>GNU nano 4.5</b> "Ko&scaron;ice"
 <br>
 <table><tr><td><ul>
@@ -63,9 +85,9 @@
 2019 April 15 - <b>GNU nano 4.1</b> "Qu&eacute; corchos ser&aacute; eso?"
 <br>
 <table><tr><td><ul>
-<li>By default, a newline character is again automatically added at the</li>
+<li>By default, a newline character is again automatically added at the<br>
   end of a buffer, to produce valid POSIX text files by default, but<br>
-  also to get back the easy adding of text at the bottom.<br>
+  also to get back the easy adding of text at the bottom.</li>
 <li>The now unneeded option <tt>--finalnewline</tt> (<tt>-f</tt>) has been removed.</li>
 <li>Syntax files are read in alphabetical order when globbing, so that<br>
   the precedence of syntaxes becomes predictable.</li>